Book Review: The Interestings by Meg Wolitzer

Every once in a while I get in the mood for some slice-of-life contemporary fiction, which feels akin to a more grown-up, literary version of Gossip Girl (which, truthfully, I have never read) in that the characters are white, middle-/upper-class, and part of the hegemony in so many other ways. Considering this criteria, The Interestings did not disappoint. The Interestings follows a group of friends who meet at a performing arts summer camp in the 1970s, and Wolitzer does a superb job at exploring the philosophies and detailing the lives of the members of this group in an entertaining and extremely thoughtful way. As is the case with this particular genre (think Jeffery Eugenides) there are a number of passages that so perfectly and artfully describe moods, thoughts, and life, that one reads them and gains a better understanding of self. However, in reading this book, every so often I would stumble upon a sentence that was so long and unwieldy as to be nearly (or sometimes completely) incomprehensible. Additionally, even though this book housed many treasures, I felt that the ending both lacked appropriate gravity and was a bit depressing. Finally, (and I recognize the hypocrisy here) the ending sentence was a kind of stream-of-consciousness run-on that felt cheap and lacking in spontaneity–not at all what I was hoping for.

 

Bottom line:

I would recommend this book, but as light summer reading to be checked out from the library.

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